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Jun 302014
 

Transworld Paper No. 34

by Pierangelo Isernia and Linda Basile

The Transworld Elites Survey explores how American and European elites perceive transatlantic relations and the policies that should be pursued to address the main global challenges across four policy domains, namely: international security, global economy, global environment and climate change, as well as human rights and democracy promotion. The present report offers a preliminary analysis of the survey and its main findings, as well as a comparison with previous data on the same topic relating to elite and mass public opinion, where available. The report is structured as follows: the first part presents the main research goals and the theoretical framework of the project. The second part discusses the fieldwork report and an overview of the target sample, as well as the methodology adopted. The third part offers a detailed analysis of the variables included in the dataset, as well as an executive summary of the main findings.

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Jun 302014
 

Transworld Paper No. 33

by Stefano Braghiroli and Luca Salini

The European Union and the United States are global actors involved in intense relations with third countries and the outside world, which pertain economic, political, diplomatic, and security-related aspects. The US has been facing in recent years a growing number of challenges from non-Western rising powers. The EU has for a while played a more assertive role vis-à-vis the outside world following a process of internal consolidation of its own institutions and structures and these developments seem to reflect a wider process of regionalisation of global relations. This study provides a comprehensive review of the existing surveys addressing the external perceptions of the EU and the US, thereby contributing to drawing their external image in its different shades: their role in the global economy, international security, human rights and democracy promotion.

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Jun 302014
 

Transworld Paper No. 32

by Danilo Di Mauro

This paper focuses on American and European attitudes towards the economy before and during the financial and economic crisis. The analysis concerns six main topics: the importance of the economy, perceptions of the economic situation, support for free-market, attitudes towards globalization, and support for both governmental and international regulation. Results confirm a remarkable effect of the financial and economic crisis on public opinion in Europe and the US for the most part of indicators analyzed. Particularly, people are more concerned with economic matters and pessimist about the economic situation. EU and US publics are less distant than expected, especially during the crisis. Most evident differences concern support for a stronger market regulation. From a first investigation, this seems linked to the trust of American conservatives in the power of “self-regulation” of the market.

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Jun 112014
 

Transworld Paper No. 30

by Kristina Puzarina, Jana Pötzschke and Hans Rattinger

This paper provides a comparative analysis of mass and elite orientations towards human rights and democracy promotion in the United States, the European Union, and Turkey. In particular, it focuses on importance, general attitudes, relevant actors as well as policies and instruments within this political area. Survey data from 2000 to 2012 show that people on both sides of the Atlantic share similar views on what constitutes a good democracy. They equally highlight the value of its electoral institutions, social welfare and prospering economy, while uniformly denouncing the importance of civic military control and religious interpretation of the legislature. Contrarily, the role of the main stakeholder seems to be a somewhat conflicting arena for the transatlantic community. In the US, more people trust national governments rather than the UN to decide on human rights. At the same time Europeans see both the EU and the UN as playing an important role in assisting other nations. When it comes to democracy promotion, both Europeans and Americans highly approve election monitoring, initiatives for civil society development and, to certain degree, economic and political sanctions. Whereas military involvement stands out as the least supported initiative for these publics.

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