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Jun 302014
 

Transworld Paper No. 36

by Eugenio Cusumano

Global environmental governance has experienced a remarkable evolution over the last two decades, seeing the United States handing over its leadership role to the European Union. This paper analyses the transformation of transatlantic environmental governance through the lens of three scenarios, namely enduring partnership, structural drift and functional relationship. While the emergence of major disagreements over key issues such as climate change and biodiversity precludes the possibility of considering transatlantic environmental relations as an enduring partnership, these tensions have not degenerated into a structural drift, and various forms of cooperation have endured at different levels and in different environmental issue-areas. Due to the coexistence of cooperation and disagreement and the key role played by domestic political factors in shaping EU and US environmental postures, the present and future evolution of the transatlantic environmental partnership can be best conceptualised as a functional relationship.

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Jun 302014
 

Transworld Paper No. 35

by Davide Tentori and Myriam Zandonini

The evolution of the transatlantic economic relationship has to be considered within the framework of a changing global environment. The bilateral partnership between the United States and the European Union is still dominant both in terms of trade and investment, although it is becoming less relevant in terms of distribution of global GDP. The Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP), which should be finally signed by early 2015, is the main element of potential convergence between the EU and the US in the near future. However, we envisage two main stumbling blocks. The increasing importance of the Pacific region for the US and the domestic problems the EU is facing in terms of sluggish growth and challenges to deeper economic integration might reduce the EU’s attractiveness as a strategic partner. The role of China, as the third main economic player on the global stage, cannot be neglected. However, it is too early to predict whether China will play along the new regulatory standards that the TTIP will set. For these reasons, the transatlantic economic relationship is still likely to maintain the status of an “enduring partnership”, although uncertainty related to the final outcome of the TTIP and the economic recovery in the EU suggest that it might be heading to a more “functional relationship” scenario.

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Jun 302014
 

Transworld Paper No. 34

by Pierangelo Isernia and Linda Basile

The Transworld Elites Survey explores how American and European elites perceive transatlantic relations and the policies that should be pursued to address the main global challenges across four policy domains, namely: international security, global economy, global environment and climate change, as well as human rights and democracy promotion. The present report offers a preliminary analysis of the survey and its main findings, as well as a comparison with previous data on the same topic relating to elite and mass public opinion, where available. The report is structured as follows: the first part presents the main research goals and the theoretical framework of the project. The second part discusses the fieldwork report and an overview of the target sample, as well as the methodology adopted. The third part offers a detailed analysis of the variables included in the dataset, as well as an executive summary of the main findings.

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Jun 302014
 

Transworld Paper No. 33

by Stefano Braghiroli and Luca Salini

The European Union and the United States are global actors involved in intense relations with third countries and the outside world, which pertain economic, political, diplomatic, and security-related aspects. The US has been facing in recent years a growing number of challenges from non-Western rising powers. The EU has for a while played a more assertive role vis-à-vis the outside world following a process of internal consolidation of its own institutions and structures and these developments seem to reflect a wider process of regionalisation of global relations. This study provides a comprehensive review of the existing surveys addressing the external perceptions of the EU and the US, thereby contributing to drawing their external image in its different shades: their role in the global economy, international security, human rights and democracy promotion.

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